Celiac Disease (CD) Comprehensive Antibody Profile (Quest)

$325.00

This blood test includes a deamidated gliaden antibodies (DGP), endosymial antibodies,
tissue transglutaminase (tTG) antibodies and total IgA. This test is used to aid in the identification of gluten sensitivity.

Description

A report presented by the National Institute of Health in 2005 stated that approximately 1 out of 105 persons in the United States may be affected by Celiac Disease. Of note, Celiac Disease is on the rise among our elderly, as well as the general population. This increase may be due to the rise in asymptomatic persons being screened. Celiac Disease is an inflammatory disorder that injures the lining of the small intestine and prevents it from absorbing parts of food that are necessary to maintain health and wellbeing. The damage is caused by an inflammatory reaction to ingesting certain proteins found in gluten, which is found in wheat, barley, rye and maybe oats. Celiac Disease doesn’t just disrupt the digestive tract. People diagnosed with Celiac Disease are more likely to have a diagnosis of osteoporosis, anemia, seizures, growth problems and birth defects. Celiac Disease is also strongly associated with many autoimmune disorders such as lupus erythematous, Hashimoto’s (thyroid disease), cancer and rheumatoid arthritis. If left undetected and unmanaged, Celiac Disease can cause serious damage to vital organ systems that may result in irreversible damage.

Test Preparation For Optimal Results:

It would be best to have this test performed before gluten has been removed from the diet. If possible, have the lab collected early in the morning or shortly after waking. For comparison purposes, have subsequent labs collected close to the same time.Disclaimer: Your health care provider should evaluate a deviation from normal ranges.

This blood test includes a deamidated gliaden antibodies (DGP), endosymial antibodies,
tissue transglutaminase (tTG) antibodies and total IgA. This test is used to aid in the identification of gluten sensitivity.

A report presented by the National Institute of Health in 2005 stated that approximately 1 out of 105 persons in the United States may be affected by Celiac Disease. Of note, Celiac Disease is on the rise among our elderly, as well as the general population. This increase may be due to the rise in asymptomatic persons being screened. Celiac Disease is an inflammatory disorder that injures the lining of the small intestine and prevents it from absorbing parts of food that are necessary to maintain health and wellbeing. The damage is caused by an inflammatory reaction to ingesting certain proteins found in gluten, which is found in wheat, barley, rye and maybe oats. Celiac Disease doesn’t just disrupt the digestive tract. People diagnosed with Celiac Disease are more likely to have a diagnosis of osteoporosis, anemia, seizures, growth problems and birth defects. Celiac Disease is also strongly associated with many autoimmune disorders such as lupus erythematous, Hashimoto’s (thyroid disease), cancer and rheumatoid arthritis. If left undetected and unmanaged, Celiac Disease can cause serious damage to vital organ systems that may result in irreversible damage.

Test Preparation For Optimal Results:

It would be best to have this test performed before gluten has been removed from the diet. If possible, have the lab collected early in the morning or shortly after waking. For comparison purposes, have subsequent labs collected close to the same time.Disclaimer: Your health care provider should evaluate a deviation from normal ranges.
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